Constructive confrontation in the workplace: three things to keep in mind/La confrontation constructive au travail: trois points a ne pas oublier.

Pages:5(3)
Author:Garza, Tomas
Position::EXPERT ADVICE/AVIS D'EXPERT
 
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To successfully navigate workplace conflict, managers must be able to confront team members in a positive, productive manner. Whatever the situation, whether two people are actively quarreling, or whether one person's behaviour is impacting the entire work culture, a manager must be able to step in, take charge and do so in a way that does not contribute to the drama.

How, then, do you constructively confront team members? How do you both get your point across and preserve team chemistry?

For any manager, these conversations can be crucial. Ongoing conflict and drama can, of course, have a ripple effect on everyone, and the last thing any organization needs is a dip in morale. Assuming this is not a situation that calls for firing, there is a great deal a manager can do to help resolve the problem, be firm and preserve group harmony.

In having these conversations, here are three things to keep in mind:

  1. Use non-accusatory language

    For many of us, it is tempting to place blame and pin an entire problem directly on someone else. After all, aren't they the ones causing the disturbance in the first place? A constructive solution, despite our first impressions, involves shelving the urge to blame and taking a step back.

    How you phrase things here makes all the difference. You can make the conversation productive by focusing the language on you. For example, you can say, "I notice you missed the last two staff meetings", or "The other day I overheard your comments about the director." The alternative would look like this: "You missed the last two staff meetings," or "You made those comments about the director." One statement talks about your observations, what you saw, noticed or heard. The other puts everything squarely on them.

    This may seem subtle, just a matter of semantics, but in constructive confrontation your word choice matters. When you talk about your observations, people naturally feel less defensive. When people do not have their guard up, you will be able to get more accomplished.

  2. Be clear

    As a manager attempting to put a stop to harmful behaviour, you must be clear in this conversation. Your group cannot afford any mixed messages. Therefore, be as clear as you can about the following:

    * What you heard or saw

    Make sure there are no ambiguities here. If you didn't experience any of the events first-hand, be sure you have gathered sufficient information. The person you are talking to needs to know exactly what it is they are doing that damages your...

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