Detailed table of contents

Author:David M. Paciocco - Lee Stuesser
Profession:Justice of the Ontario Court of Justice - Professor of Law, Bond University
Pages:vii-xix
 
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FOREWORD TO THE FIFTH EDITION xxi

PREFACE xxiii

CHAPTER 1:

INTRODUCTION 1

  1. The Role of the Law of Evidence 1

    1.1) Rules of Process 2

    1.2) Rules of Admissibility 2

    1.3) Rules of Reasoning 5

    1.4) The Challenge of the Law of Evidence 6

  2. The Sources of Evidence Law 6

  3. Trends in the Law of Evidence 7

    3.1) The Purposive Approach 8

    3.2) The Development of a General Exclusionary Discretion 10

    3.3) Increased Admissibility 11

  4. The Variable Application of the Law of Evidence: Courts and Tribunals 12

  5. Putting the Rules of Evidence in a Context 15

    5.1) The Voir Dire 15

    5.2) The Criminal Trial Process — An Illustration 16

  6. Enforcing the Law of Evidence 20

    6.1) Enforcement at the Hearing 20

    6.2) Enforcement on Appeal 21

    6.2 (a) Where the Party Appealing Did Object 21

    6.2 (b) Where the Party Appealing Did Not Object 21

    CHAPTER 2:

    THE BASICS OF ADMISSIBILITY AND THE EVALUATION OF EVIDENCE 24

  7. The Basic Rule of Admissibility 24

  8. Materiality 25

    2.1) The Concept Explained 25

    2.2) Primary Materiality 25

    2.3) Secondary Materiality 26

    2.4) The Reception of Immaterial Evidence 27

  9. Relevance 27

    3.1) The Concept Explained 27

    3.2) Direct Evidence, Circumstantial Evidence, and Relevance 27

    3.3) The Standard of Logical Relevance 28

    3.4) Logical Relevance and Context 29

    3.5) The Controversy about Logic and Human Experience 30

  10. Evaluating or Weighing the Probative Value of Evidence 32

    4.1) How Believable Is the Evidence? 32

    4.2) How Informative Is the Evidence? 33

    4.3) The “Legal Relevance” Concept 33

  11. The Exclusionary Discretion 34

    5.1) The Nature of the Discretion 34

    5.2) The Exclusionary Discretion and Weighing “Probative Value” 37

    5.3) The Concept of Prejudice 39

    5.4) The Balancing 40

  12. Relevance, Materiality, and Narration 42

  13. Standards of Admissibility of Evidence 43

    7.1) Testimony Where No Exclusionary Rule Is in Issue 44

    7.2) Exhibits or “Real Evidence” 44

    7.3) Rules Having “Factual Triggers” 45

    7.3 (a) Proving Factual Triggers on the Balance of Probabilities 45

    7.3 (b) Proving Factual Triggers beyond a Reasonable Doubt 45

    7.4) Basic Common Law Rules of Exclusion Pertaining to the Nature or Effect of the Evidence 47

    7.5) Statutory Modifications 48

    CHAPTER 3:

    CHARACTER EVIDENCE: PRIMARY MATERIALITY 49

  14. Introduction 49

    1.1) Generally 49

    1.2) Character and Relevance 50

    1.3) Character and Habit 50

  15. Discreditable Conduct Evidence Called by the Prosecution in a Criminal Case 52

  16. The Prohibited Inference 53

  17. The “Similar Fact Evidence” Rule Described 55

    4.1) The Scope of the “Similar Fact Evidence Rule” 55

    4.2) The “Similar Fact Evidence Rule” Stated 56

    4.3) The Development of the Rule 56

    4.4) The Similar Fact Rule and the Avoidance of General Propensity Reasoning 58

    4.5) Categories of Cases 59

  18. Step 1 in the Analysis: Weighing Probative Value 60

    5.1) The Strength of the Evidence That the Similar Acts Occurred 60

    5.1 (a) Generally 60

    5.1 (b) Acquittals and Stays 61

    5.1 (c) Collaboration 62

    5.2) The Extent to Which the Proposed Evidence Supports the Desired Inferences 63

    5.2 (a) Connection to the Accused 63

    5.2 (b) “Connectedness” to a Properly Defined Issue 64

    5.2 (c) Discreditable Conduct That Is Directly Relevant 68

    5.2 (d) Discreditable Conduct Establishing Mens Rea 68

    5.2 (e) Discreditable Conduct Establishing Actus Reus 69

    5.2 (f) Discreditable Conduct and the Credibility of Complainants 70

    5.2 (g) Discreditable Conduct Relating to the Alleged Victim 71

    5.3) The Materiality of the Evidence 72

    5.4) Confirmation by Other Evidence 72

  19. Step 2 in the Analysis: Assessing Prejudice for the Purpose of Admissibility 73

    6.1) Moral Prejudice 74

    6.2) Reasoning Prejudice 75

    6.3) Factors Reducing the Impact of Prejudice 75

    6.4) Factors Enhancing the Impact of Prejudice 76

  20. The Balancing 76

  21. The Mandatory Direction 77

  22. The Special Case of Proving Identity through Similar Fact Evidence 79

  23. The Problem of Multi-count Indictments or Informations 81

  24. Character Evidence Called by an Accused (Against a Co-accused) 83

  25. “Good” or Exculpatory Character Evidence Called by an Accused: Introduced 84

  26. Good Character Evidence and Modes of Presentation 86

    13.1) Reputation Evidence 86

    13.2) Opinion Evidence 86

    13.3) The Testimony of the Accused 87

    13.4) Similar Fact Evidence Indicative of Innocence 88

  27. Good Character Evidence and Crown Rebuttal Evidence 89

    14.1) Cross-examination 89

    14.2) Rebuttal Reputation Evidence 90

    14.3) Section 666 of the Criminal Code 90

    14.4) Expert Evidence 90

    14.5) Similar Fact Evidence 90

    14.6) Prior Inconsistent Statements 91

    14.7) Testimony Relating to Specific Acts Not Satisfying the Similar Fact Evidence Rule 91

  28. The Character of Third Parties in Criminal Cases 92

    15.1) Generally 92

    15.1 (a) Admissibility of a Third Party’s Character 92

    15.1 (b) Rebuttal Evidence and the Character of the Accused 93

    15.1 (c) Third-party Evidence Called by the Crown 95

    15.2) Complainants in Sexual Offence Cases 95

    15.2 (a) The Prohibited Purposes 96

    15.2 (b) Probative Value and Prejudice 97

  29. Character Evidence in Civil Cases 98

    16.1) Generally 99

    16.2) The Good Character of Parties: Primary Materiality 99

    16.3) The Bad Character of Parties: Primary Materiality 99

    16.4) Character of Third Parties 102

    CHAPTER 4:

    HEARSAY 103

  30. Recognizing Hearsay 103

  31. Statements Offered for Their Truth 105

  32. Prior Statements of Witnesses: Absence of Contemporaneous Cross-examination 107

  33. Implied Statements 108

    CHAPTER 5:

    HEARSAY EXCEPTIONS 113

  34. Principles Underlying the Exceptions 113

    1.1) Reasonable Necessity 119

    1.2) Threshold Reliability 122

    1.2 (a) Inherent Trustworthiness 124

    1.2 (b) Can the Evidence be Tested? 127

  35. Prior Inconsistent Statements 129

  36. Prior Identifications 134

  37. Prior Testimony 138

    4.1) The Common Law Exception 138

    4.2) Admissibility under the Rules of Court 140

    4.3) Admissibility under the Criminal Code 140

  38. Prior Convictions 143

  39. Admissions of a Party 146

    6.1) Formal and Informal Admissions 148

    6.2) Admissions Need Not Be Based on Personal Knowledge 149

    ...

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